Exceptional Math

Blueprint’s and the city’s math is exceptional. That is, the city allows exceptions to its building code when Blueprint’s math doesn’t add up.

Problem 1: If Seattle’s building code requires 82-square feet for garbage/recycling receptacles for one of the live/work buildings, how many square feet are required for garbage/recycling receptacles for one of the live/work buildings?

Choose one answer. Show your work:  a) 82-square feet    b) 30-square feet

Answer: If you’re the DPD or Blueprint bending the rules, the answer is b) 30-square feet (82-square feet = 30-square feet). Correct answer: a) 82-square feet (82-square feet = 82-square feet).

Problem 2A: If a developer builds a triplex with 3 live/work units plus another triplex with 3 live/work units separated by 12 inches on a small lot, how many live/work units are there in total on the small lot?

Choose one answer. Show your work. a) The developer is building a total of 3 units.    b) The developer is building a total of 6 units.

Answer: If you’re the developer or the DPD, the answer is a) 3 (3+3=3). Correct answer: b) 6 units (3+3=6).

Problem 2B: In the problem above, why would the developer add 12 inches in the middle of the 6 units?

Answer: So the developer–with the city’s approval–can claim he’s building two sets of 3 units (not 6) and evade the law that more than 3 live/work units requires public notice, design review and a traffic study.

 

 

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